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Artist Feature: Jahlemi

We’ve been featuring Jahlemi on our Rising Stars show recently – and we caught up with him to find out a little bit more about his life and music.

Tell us a little bit about your yourself?

I was born as a talented musician in southern Cameroons.

When did you first start to develop a passion for music?

I involved myself in choirs at the age of seven and rapidly became a leader of each group. From there I grew from school competitions to reggae jam sessions with prominent artists like Chimi Butazi, a Cameroonian reggae performer, and Etub Eyang, a Rock and Roll musician.

Which artists did you listen to while growing up?

Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, and Eric Donaldson just to name a few.

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard you before?

Roots reggae music and music that focuses attention on the real problems that affect our society, be it political, social, or love.

What music have you recorded and released to date?

I was greatly impacted by the Rwandan Genocide and the mass killing of innocent people across Africa in the 1980s, finding inspiration for my own music in the problems within society. As a Nurse Practitioner, I am adept at offering health solutions to sick people and I use my music to heal and support people.

My newest song, “Poor Woman,” talks about a homeless woman who has become a victim of fighting for freedom. This powerful song makes reference to how this woman has lost all her children in the course of fighting for freedom.

I have written songs like “Ambazonian People,” and “Southern Cameroonians” to condemn the mass killings of innocent Southern Cameroonians by the government of Cameroonian and the French government. These songs were played across Africa and beyond to shed light on the brutality of these two evil regimes.

As a freedom fighter, I could not stay silent when George Floyd was murdered by police officers because of his skin color. The song “Skin Color” clarifies that Racial Discrimination is alive and strong. One of the most substantial quotes from myself is “I am standing up as the voice of the voiceless.”

I have recorded other music too. I started my music career under my original name, Gallus Fotabong. Under this name I released the following songs: Stop this Fighting; Vampires; Jah Jah Hear My Plea; Black People; Blame Game; Homeless Children; Zion; Beautiful Lady; Vampires Remix.

Which artists do you enjoy listening to at the moment – and do they influence your work?

The artists that I enjoy listening to at the moment are Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, Eric Donaldson, Gregory Isaac and a host of others. I don’t think these artists actually influence my music career at this point.

Who would your dream collaboration be with?

My dream collaboration would be Ziggy Marley and Alpha Blondy.

What are your plans for the future?

To continue writing great songs and to definitely have my music across the entire planet earth, and to continue using my music to bring solutions to the problems of the world.

How can people find out more about you?

I have an official website at jahlemi.com and from there you can link to my streaming services and social media.

Artist Feature: Jahlemi

We’ve been featuring Jahlemi on our Rising Stars show recently – and we caught up with him to find out a little bit more about his life and music.

Tell us a little bit about your yourself?

I was born as a talented musician in southern Cameroons.

When did you first start to develop a passion for music?

I involved myself in choirs at the age of seven and rapidly became a leader of each group. From there I grew from school competitions to reggae jam sessions with prominent artists like Chimi Butazi, a Cameroonian reggae performer, and Etub Eyang, a Rock and Roll musician.

Which artists did you listen to while growing up?

Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, and Eric Donaldson just to name a few.

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard you before?

Roots reggae music and music that focuses attention on the real problems that affect our society, be it political, social, or love.

What music have you recorded and released to date?

I was greatly impacted by the Rwandan Genocide and the mass killing of innocent people across Africa in the 1980s, finding inspiration for my own music in the problems within society. As a Nurse Practitioner, I am adept at offering health solutions to sick people and I use my music to heal and support people.

My newest song, “Poor Woman,” talks about a homeless woman who has become a victim of fighting for freedom. This powerful song makes reference to how this woman has lost all her children in the course of fighting for freedom.

I have written songs like “Ambazonian People,” and “Southern Cameroonians” to condemn the mass killings of innocent Southern Cameroonians by the government of Cameroonian and the French government. These songs were played across Africa and beyond to shed light on the brutality of these two evil regimes.

As a freedom fighter, I could not stay silent when George Floyd was murdered by police officers because of his skin color. The song “Skin Color” clarifies that Racial Discrimination is alive and strong. One of the most substantial quotes from myself is “I am standing up as the voice of the voiceless.”

I have recorded other music too. I started my music career under my original name, Gallus Fotabong. Under this name I released the following songs: Stop this Fighting; Vampires; Jah Jah Hear My Plea; Black People; Blame Game; Homeless Children; Zion; Beautiful Lady; Vampires Remix.

Which artists do you enjoy listening to at the moment – and do they influence your work?

The artists that I enjoy listening to at the moment are Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, Eric Donaldson, Gregory Isaac and a host of others. I don’t think these artists actually influence my music career at this point.

Who would your dream collaboration be with?

My dream collaboration would be Ziggy Marley and Alpha Blondy.

What are your plans for the future?

To continue writing great songs and to definitely have my music across the entire planet earth, and to continue using my music to bring solutions to the problems of the world.

How can people find out more about you?

I have an official website at jahlemi.com and from there you can link to my streaming services and social media.

Artist Feature: Jahlemi

We’ve been featuring Jahlemi on our Rising Stars show recently – and we caught up with him to find out a little bit more about his life and music.

Tell us a little bit about your yourself?

I was born as a talented musician in southern Cameroons.

When did you first start to develop a passion for music?

I involved myself in choirs at the age of seven and rapidly became a leader of each group. From there I grew from school competitions to reggae jam sessions with prominent artists like Chimi Butazi, a Cameroonian reggae performer, and Etub Eyang, a Rock and Roll musician.

Which artists did you listen to while growing up?

Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, and Eric Donaldson just to name a few.

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard you before?

Roots reggae music and music that focuses attention on the real problems that affect our society, be it political, social, or love.

What music have you recorded and released to date?

I was greatly impacted by the Rwandan Genocide and the mass killing of innocent people across Africa in the 1980s, finding inspiration for my own music in the problems within society. As a Nurse Practitioner, I am adept at offering health solutions to sick people and I use my music to heal and support people.

My newest song, “Poor Woman,” talks about a homeless woman who has become a victim of fighting for freedom. This powerful song makes reference to how this woman has lost all her children in the course of fighting for freedom.

I have written songs like “Ambazonian People,” and “Southern Cameroonians” to condemn the mass killings of innocent Southern Cameroonians by the government of Cameroonian and the French government. These songs were played across Africa and beyond to shed light on the brutality of these two evil regimes.

As a freedom fighter, I could not stay silent when George Floyd was murdered by police officers because of his skin color. The song “Skin Color” clarifies that Racial Discrimination is alive and strong. One of the most substantial quotes from myself is “I am standing up as the voice of the voiceless.”

I have recorded other music too. I started my music career under my original name, Gallus Fotabong. Under this name I released the following songs: Stop this Fighting; Vampires; Jah Jah Hear My Plea; Black People; Blame Game; Homeless Children; Zion; Beautiful Lady; Vampires Remix.

Which artists do you enjoy listening to at the moment – and do they influence your work?

The artists that I enjoy listening to at the moment are Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, Eric Donaldson, Gregory Isaac and a host of others. I don’t think these artists actually influence my music career at this point.

Who would your dream collaboration be with?

My dream collaboration would be Ziggy Marley and Alpha Blondy.

What are your plans for the future?

To continue writing great songs and to definitely have my music across the entire planet earth, and to continue using my music to bring solutions to the problems of the world.

How can people find out more about you?

I have an official website at jahlemi.com and from there you can link to my streaming services and social media.

Artist Feature: Jahlemi

We’ve been featuring Jahlemi on our Rising Stars show recently – and we caught up with him to find out a little bit more about his life and music.

Tell us a little bit about your yourself?

I was born as a talented musician in southern Cameroons.

When did you first start to develop a passion for music?

I involved myself in choirs at the age of seven and rapidly became a leader of each group. From there I grew from school competitions to reggae jam sessions with prominent artists like Chimi Butazi, a Cameroonian reggae performer, and Etub Eyang, a Rock and Roll musician.

Which artists did you listen to while growing up?

Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, and Eric Donaldson just to name a few.

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t heard you before?

Roots reggae music and music that focuses attention on the real problems that affect our society, be it political, social, or love.

What music have you recorded and released to date?

I was greatly impacted by the Rwandan Genocide and the mass killing of innocent people across Africa in the 1980s, finding inspiration for my own music in the problems within society. As a Nurse Practitioner, I am adept at offering health solutions to sick people and I use my music to heal and support people.

My newest song, “Poor Woman,” talks about a homeless woman who has become a victim of fighting for freedom. This powerful song makes reference to how this woman has lost all her children in the course of fighting for freedom.

I have written songs like “Ambazonian People,” and “Southern Cameroonians” to condemn the mass killings of innocent Southern Cameroonians by the government of Cameroonian and the French government. These songs were played across Africa and beyond to shed light on the brutality of these two evil regimes.

As a freedom fighter, I could not stay silent when George Floyd was murdered by police officers because of his skin color. The song “Skin Color” clarifies that Racial Discrimination is alive and strong. One of the most substantial quotes from myself is “I am standing up as the voice of the voiceless.”

I have recorded other music too. I started my music career under my original name, Gallus Fotabong. Under this name I released the following songs: Stop this Fighting; Vampires; Jah Jah Hear My Plea; Black People; Blame Game; Homeless Children; Zion; Beautiful Lady; Vampires Remix.

Which artists do you enjoy listening to at the moment – and do they influence your work?

The artists that I enjoy listening to at the moment are Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lucky Dube, Eric Donaldson, Gregory Isaac and a host of others. I don’t think these artists actually influence my music career at this point.

Who would your dream collaboration be with?

My dream collaboration would be Ziggy Marley and Alpha Blondy.

What are your plans for the future?

To continue writing great songs and to definitely have my music across the entire planet earth, and to continue using my music to bring solutions to the problems of the world.

How can people find out more about you?

I have an official website at jahlemi.com and from there you can link to my streaming services and social media.

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