Brentwood: currently 3°C, a few clouds
high today 10°C, low tonight 6°C
sunrise 6.36am, sunset 5.43pm
Now playing:
Aqualung - Brighter Than Sunshine
Listen Live Webcam


Peter Taylor: “I am still fit enough so hopefully that phone will ring one day”

Looking to get back into the game – Peter Taylor (Photo: Nicky Hayes)

The term experienced can often be overused in football. That certainly isn’t the case for Peter Taylor.

Having managed in a plethora of divisions since landing his first managerial job at Dartford in 1986, the Rochford-born manager has also been involved in international set-ups with roles as manager of Bahrain as well as Assistant Manager of New Zealand.

However, he is more well-known for taking charge of England for one game in November 2000 where the Three Lions fell to a 1-0 defeat to Italy.

Taylor’s most recent role was in charge of Isthmian North Division outfit Maldon & Tiptree but he departed the Wallace Binder Ground in August.

The Jammers now sit in sixth place and Taylor reflects on his time at the club.

“I thoroughly enjoyed it to be honest with you,” he said.

“It was a bit of a challenge to start off with because the team were struggling – they had lost the first ten matches of the season.

“Normally, if a team does that they are usually relegated but I think slowly but surely, we were getting a decent team together.

“It is showing now that they are winning most weeks so I think they have got a bright future there with some very good players.

“I enjoyed doing it two or three times a week and I enjoyed training the players again.”

Taylor’s last stint in international management ended in 2017 with New Zealand having taken the reigns as manager of Bahrain in 2011.

With the latter, he lifted the national team’s first regional competition in their history and subsequently wrote his name in the Bahrain footballing history books.

He explores the differences between working for a club and an international side.

“The main difference is that you don’t have as many matches,” the ex-Leicester City boss stated.

“If you are an international manager, they are not your players so you have to show respect to the manager of their club team.

“You have also got to do it right for your country so I have been involved with England, Bahrain and New Zealand.

“In club football, you are playing every week – you are signing a player, you are dealing with their problems and you are dealing with their agents.

“International football is more like half a dozen get-togethers every year.

“They are all very enjoyable, I would say international football is more for the older manager because a younger one still has that changing room hunger.”

During his playing days, the 70-year-old had a two-year spell at Southend United before going on to feature for teams including Crystal Palace, Tottenham Hotspur and Leyton Orient.

He returned to South East Essex to manage Southend in 1993 and they currently sit in 14th place in the Vanarama National League. However, they were deducted ten points earlier this season after they failed to clear a tax bill.

On the pitch, they are thriving under Kevin Maher – notwithstanding that they have been under a transfer embargo for over a year.

Taylor is disappointed that with such a large fanbase, the Shrimpers haven’t been able to progress in recent years.

“When Steve Tilson was manager there, they were improving their crowds every week and that was very good for Steve – he deserved a lot of credit for that,” he said.

“I couldn’t possibly understand why they are in such a pickle, financially, because they have got the potential of getting over 10,000 every week.

“There have been times when Southend have had too many staff and players and the bad news at times have been where the players haven’t been paid.

“You shouldn’t have too many players and staff if you can’t afford to pay the wage bill – the life of the football club is more important than just winning a trophy.

“There is no point in winning a trophy, overspending and putting yourself in a lot of financial problems but the most important thing to do is to do it right and pay what you can afford.”

Taylor has had a very long career but one of those career highlights is taking charge of England for one game.

He managed a 1-0 defeat to Italy in a friendly in Turin and he most notably brought a number of youngsters into the side for that game including Emile Heskey, Rio Ferdinand and Jamie Carragher.

The three went on to have very successful careers for the Three Lions and for their clubs.

Understandably, Taylor views managing his country as one of his proudest achievements in the game.

“I am a Rochford boy through and through and like any youngster out there, they want to play football and eventually go onto manage,” he stated.

“I was trying to play for Southend and play for the teams I played for and I wanted to have a decent career for the game that I love.

“All of a sudden, you get the opportunity to lead your country for one match which was an unbelievable experience for me.

“It’s one that I never thought would happen but I am glad it did– there were positives coming out from the game because I made my mind up that I would play a younger team.

“The new manager, Sven-Göran Eriksson, who came in after me knew that we had some good youngsters that could handle playing for their country.”

Taylor also adds the other moments in his career that he views as the most memorable, alongside managing England.

“I am very lucky that I have played and managed at every different level and I have played for England at every different level.

“I have been very fortunate to have different experiences.

“At club level as a manager, my best experience would be Hull City because they were 18th in League Two when myself and my staff took over.

“We ended up getting them a couple of promotions and building a lovely training ground and selling some players to make the club more secure.

“Everything about the Hull job was a tremendous experience and one I am very proud of.

“I also had several promotions at Gillingham, Wycombe Wanderers and Brighton & Hove Albion.”

Taylor has been out of work for a few months following his departure from Maldon.

He says he is keeping busy while not being in a management role and is looking to get back into the game when the right opportunity arises.

“I am doing some scouting at the moment which I am enjoying because I am helping a younger manager, I am helping Dagenham & Redbridge,” Taylor said.

“I am definitely interested in doing something like I did Maldon again.

“I am still fit enough, I took a training session at Bromley’s U21’s so hopefully that phone will ring one day!”

Still fit and firing aged 70, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see Taylor taking the reigns of a non-league side in the near future.

Peter Taylor: “I am still fit enough so hopefully that phone will ring one day”

Looking to get back into the game – Peter Taylor (Photo: Nicky Hayes)

The term experienced can often be overused in football. That certainly isn’t the case for Peter Taylor.

Having managed in a plethora of divisions since landing his first managerial job at Dartford in 1986, the Rochford-born manager has also been involved in international set-ups with roles as manager of Bahrain as well as Assistant Manager of New Zealand.

However, he is more well-known for taking charge of England for one game in November 2000 where the Three Lions fell to a 1-0 defeat to Italy.

Taylor’s most recent role was in charge of Isthmian North Division outfit Maldon & Tiptree but he departed the Wallace Binder Ground in August.

The Jammers now sit in sixth place and Taylor reflects on his time at the club.

“I thoroughly enjoyed it to be honest with you,” he said.

“It was a bit of a challenge to start off with because the team were struggling – they had lost the first ten matches of the season.

“Normally, if a team does that they are usually relegated but I think slowly but surely, we were getting a decent team together.

“It is showing now that they are winning most weeks so I think they have got a bright future there with some very good players.

“I enjoyed doing it two or three times a week and I enjoyed training the players again.”

Taylor’s last stint in international management ended in 2017 with New Zealand having taken the reigns as manager of Bahrain in 2011.

With the latter, he lifted the national team’s first regional competition in their history and subsequently wrote his name in the Bahrain footballing history books.

He explores the differences between working for a club and an international side.

“The main difference is that you don’t have as many matches,” the ex-Leicester City boss stated.

“If you are an international manager, they are not your players so you have to show respect to the manager of their club team.

“You have also got to do it right for your country so I have been involved with England, Bahrain and New Zealand.

“In club football, you are playing every week – you are signing a player, you are dealing with their problems and you are dealing with their agents.

“International football is more like half a dozen get-togethers every year.

“They are all very enjoyable, I would say international football is more for the older manager because a younger one still has that changing room hunger.”

During his playing days, the 70-year-old had a two-year spell at Southend United before going on to feature for teams including Crystal Palace, Tottenham Hotspur and Leyton Orient.

He returned to South East Essex to manage Southend in 1993 and they currently sit in 14th place in the Vanarama National League. However, they were deducted ten points earlier this season after they failed to clear a tax bill.

On the pitch, they are thriving under Kevin Maher – notwithstanding that they have been under a transfer embargo for over a year.

Taylor is disappointed that with such a large fanbase, the Shrimpers haven’t been able to progress in recent years.

“When Steve Tilson was manager there, they were improving their crowds every week and that was very good for Steve – he deserved a lot of credit for that,” he said.

“I couldn’t possibly understand why they are in such a pickle, financially, because they have got the potential of getting over 10,000 every week.

“There have been times when Southend have had too many staff and players and the bad news at times have been where the players haven’t been paid.

“You shouldn’t have too many players and staff if you can’t afford to pay the wage bill – the life of the football club is more important than just winning a trophy.

“There is no point in winning a trophy, overspending and putting yourself in a lot of financial problems but the most important thing to do is to do it right and pay what you can afford.”

Taylor has had a very long career but one of those career highlights is taking charge of England for one game.

He managed a 1-0 defeat to Italy in a friendly in Turin and he most notably brought a number of youngsters into the side for that game including Emile Heskey, Rio Ferdinand and Jamie Carragher.

The three went on to have very successful careers for the Three Lions and for their clubs.

Understandably, Taylor views managing his country as one of his proudest achievements in the game.

“I am a Rochford boy through and through and like any youngster out there, they want to play football and eventually go onto manage,” he stated.

“I was trying to play for Southend and play for the teams I played for and I wanted to have a decent career for the game that I love.

“All of a sudden, you get the opportunity to lead your country for one match which was an unbelievable experience for me.

“It’s one that I never thought would happen but I am glad it did– there were positives coming out from the game because I made my mind up that I would play a younger team.

“The new manager, Sven-Göran Eriksson, who came in after me knew that we had some good youngsters that could handle playing for their country.”

Taylor also adds the other moments in his career that he views as the most memorable, alongside managing England.

“I am very lucky that I have played and managed at every different level and I have played for England at every different level.

“I have been very fortunate to have different experiences.

“At club level as a manager, my best experience would be Hull City because they were 18th in League Two when myself and my staff took over.

“We ended up getting them a couple of promotions and building a lovely training ground and selling some players to make the club more secure.

“Everything about the Hull job was a tremendous experience and one I am very proud of.

“I also had several promotions at Gillingham, Wycombe Wanderers and Brighton & Hove Albion.”

Taylor has been out of work for a few months following his departure from Maldon.

He says he is keeping busy while not being in a management role and is looking to get back into the game when the right opportunity arises.

“I am doing some scouting at the moment which I am enjoying because I am helping a younger manager, I am helping Dagenham & Redbridge,” Taylor said.

“I am definitely interested in doing something like I did Maldon again.

“I am still fit enough, I took a training session at Bromley’s U21’s so hopefully that phone will ring one day!”

Still fit and firing aged 70, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see Taylor taking the reigns of a non-league side in the near future.

Peter Taylor: “I am still fit enough so hopefully that phone will ring one day”

Looking to get back into the game – Peter Taylor (Photo: Nicky Hayes)

The term experienced can often be overused in football. That certainly isn’t the case for Peter Taylor.

Having managed in a plethora of divisions since landing his first managerial job at Dartford in 1986, the Rochford-born manager has also been involved in international set-ups with roles as manager of Bahrain as well as Assistant Manager of New Zealand.

However, he is more well-known for taking charge of England for one game in November 2000 where the Three Lions fell to a 1-0 defeat to Italy.

Taylor’s most recent role was in charge of Isthmian North Division outfit Maldon & Tiptree but he departed the Wallace Binder Ground in August.

The Jammers now sit in sixth place and Taylor reflects on his time at the club.

“I thoroughly enjoyed it to be honest with you,” he said.

“It was a bit of a challenge to start off with because the team were struggling – they had lost the first ten matches of the season.

“Normally, if a team does that they are usually relegated but I think slowly but surely, we were getting a decent team together.

“It is showing now that they are winning most weeks so I think they have got a bright future there with some very good players.

“I enjoyed doing it two or three times a week and I enjoyed training the players again.”

Taylor’s last stint in international management ended in 2017 with New Zealand having taken the reigns as manager of Bahrain in 2011.

With the latter, he lifted the national team’s first regional competition in their history and subsequently wrote his name in the Bahrain footballing history books.

He explores the differences between working for a club and an international side.

“The main difference is that you don’t have as many matches,” the ex-Leicester City boss stated.

“If you are an international manager, they are not your players so you have to show respect to the manager of their club team.

“You have also got to do it right for your country so I have been involved with England, Bahrain and New Zealand.

“In club football, you are playing every week – you are signing a player, you are dealing with their problems and you are dealing with their agents.

“International football is more like half a dozen get-togethers every year.

“They are all very enjoyable, I would say international football is more for the older manager because a younger one still has that changing room hunger.”

During his playing days, the 70-year-old had a two-year spell at Southend United before going on to feature for teams including Crystal Palace, Tottenham Hotspur and Leyton Orient.

He returned to South East Essex to manage Southend in 1993 and they currently sit in 14th place in the Vanarama National League. However, they were deducted ten points earlier this season after they failed to clear a tax bill.

On the pitch, they are thriving under Kevin Maher – notwithstanding that they have been under a transfer embargo for over a year.

Taylor is disappointed that with such a large fanbase, the Shrimpers haven’t been able to progress in recent years.

“When Steve Tilson was manager there, they were improving their crowds every week and that was very good for Steve – he deserved a lot of credit for that,” he said.

“I couldn’t possibly understand why they are in such a pickle, financially, because they have got the potential of getting over 10,000 every week.

“There have been times when Southend have had too many staff and players and the bad news at times have been where the players haven’t been paid.

“You shouldn’t have too many players and staff if you can’t afford to pay the wage bill – the life of the football club is more important than just winning a trophy.

“There is no point in winning a trophy, overspending and putting yourself in a lot of financial problems but the most important thing to do is to do it right and pay what you can afford.”

Taylor has had a very long career but one of those career highlights is taking charge of England for one game.

He managed a 1-0 defeat to Italy in a friendly in Turin and he most notably brought a number of youngsters into the side for that game including Emile Heskey, Rio Ferdinand and Jamie Carragher.

The three went on to have very successful careers for the Three Lions and for their clubs.

Understandably, Taylor views managing his country as one of his proudest achievements in the game.

“I am a Rochford boy through and through and like any youngster out there, they want to play football and eventually go onto manage,” he stated.

“I was trying to play for Southend and play for the teams I played for and I wanted to have a decent career for the game that I love.

“All of a sudden, you get the opportunity to lead your country for one match which was an unbelievable experience for me.

“It’s one that I never thought would happen but I am glad it did– there were positives coming out from the game because I made my mind up that I would play a younger team.

“The new manager, Sven-Göran Eriksson, who came in after me knew that we had some good youngsters that could handle playing for their country.”

Taylor also adds the other moments in his career that he views as the most memorable, alongside managing England.

“I am very lucky that I have played and managed at every different level and I have played for England at every different level.

“I have been very fortunate to have different experiences.

“At club level as a manager, my best experience would be Hull City because they were 18th in League Two when myself and my staff took over.

“We ended up getting them a couple of promotions and building a lovely training ground and selling some players to make the club more secure.

“Everything about the Hull job was a tremendous experience and one I am very proud of.

“I also had several promotions at Gillingham, Wycombe Wanderers and Brighton & Hove Albion.”

Taylor has been out of work for a few months following his departure from Maldon.

He says he is keeping busy while not being in a management role and is looking to get back into the game when the right opportunity arises.

“I am doing some scouting at the moment which I am enjoying because I am helping a younger manager, I am helping Dagenham & Redbridge,” Taylor said.

“I am definitely interested in doing something like I did Maldon again.

“I am still fit enough, I took a training session at Bromley’s U21’s so hopefully that phone will ring one day!”

Still fit and firing aged 70, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see Taylor taking the reigns of a non-league side in the near future.

Peter Taylor: “I am still fit enough so hopefully that phone will ring one day”

Looking to get back into the game – Peter Taylor (Photo: Nicky Hayes)

The term experienced can often be overused in football. That certainly isn’t the case for Peter Taylor.

Having managed in a plethora of divisions since landing his first managerial job at Dartford in 1986, the Rochford-born manager has also been involved in international set-ups with roles as manager of Bahrain as well as Assistant Manager of New Zealand.

However, he is more well-known for taking charge of England for one game in November 2000 where the Three Lions fell to a 1-0 defeat to Italy.

Taylor’s most recent role was in charge of Isthmian North Division outfit Maldon & Tiptree but he departed the Wallace Binder Ground in August.

The Jammers now sit in sixth place and Taylor reflects on his time at the club.

“I thoroughly enjoyed it to be honest with you,” he said.

“It was a bit of a challenge to start off with because the team were struggling – they had lost the first ten matches of the season.

“Normally, if a team does that they are usually relegated but I think slowly but surely, we were getting a decent team together.

“It is showing now that they are winning most weeks so I think they have got a bright future there with some very good players.

“I enjoyed doing it two or three times a week and I enjoyed training the players again.”

Taylor’s last stint in international management ended in 2017 with New Zealand having taken the reigns as manager of Bahrain in 2011.

With the latter, he lifted the national team’s first regional competition in their history and subsequently wrote his name in the Bahrain footballing history books.

He explores the differences between working for a club and an international side.

“The main difference is that you don’t have as many matches,” the ex-Leicester City boss stated.

“If you are an international manager, they are not your players so you have to show respect to the manager of their club team.

“You have also got to do it right for your country so I have been involved with England, Bahrain and New Zealand.

“In club football, you are playing every week – you are signing a player, you are dealing with their problems and you are dealing with their agents.

“International football is more like half a dozen get-togethers every year.

“They are all very enjoyable, I would say international football is more for the older manager because a younger one still has that changing room hunger.”

During his playing days, the 70-year-old had a two-year spell at Southend United before going on to feature for teams including Crystal Palace, Tottenham Hotspur and Leyton Orient.

He returned to South East Essex to manage Southend in 1993 and they currently sit in 14th place in the Vanarama National League. However, they were deducted ten points earlier this season after they failed to clear a tax bill.

On the pitch, they are thriving under Kevin Maher – notwithstanding that they have been under a transfer embargo for over a year.

Taylor is disappointed that with such a large fanbase, the Shrimpers haven’t been able to progress in recent years.

“When Steve Tilson was manager there, they were improving their crowds every week and that was very good for Steve – he deserved a lot of credit for that,” he said.

“I couldn’t possibly understand why they are in such a pickle, financially, because they have got the potential of getting over 10,000 every week.

“There have been times when Southend have had too many staff and players and the bad news at times have been where the players haven’t been paid.

“You shouldn’t have too many players and staff if you can’t afford to pay the wage bill – the life of the football club is more important than just winning a trophy.

“There is no point in winning a trophy, overspending and putting yourself in a lot of financial problems but the most important thing to do is to do it right and pay what you can afford.”

Taylor has had a very long career but one of those career highlights is taking charge of England for one game.

He managed a 1-0 defeat to Italy in a friendly in Turin and he most notably brought a number of youngsters into the side for that game including Emile Heskey, Rio Ferdinand and Jamie Carragher.

The three went on to have very successful careers for the Three Lions and for their clubs.

Understandably, Taylor views managing his country as one of his proudest achievements in the game.

“I am a Rochford boy through and through and like any youngster out there, they want to play football and eventually go onto manage,” he stated.

“I was trying to play for Southend and play for the teams I played for and I wanted to have a decent career for the game that I love.

“All of a sudden, you get the opportunity to lead your country for one match which was an unbelievable experience for me.

“It’s one that I never thought would happen but I am glad it did– there were positives coming out from the game because I made my mind up that I would play a younger team.

“The new manager, Sven-Göran Eriksson, who came in after me knew that we had some good youngsters that could handle playing for their country.”

Taylor also adds the other moments in his career that he views as the most memorable, alongside managing England.

“I am very lucky that I have played and managed at every different level and I have played for England at every different level.

“I have been very fortunate to have different experiences.

“At club level as a manager, my best experience would be Hull City because they were 18th in League Two when myself and my staff took over.

“We ended up getting them a couple of promotions and building a lovely training ground and selling some players to make the club more secure.

“Everything about the Hull job was a tremendous experience and one I am very proud of.

“I also had several promotions at Gillingham, Wycombe Wanderers and Brighton & Hove Albion.”

Taylor has been out of work for a few months following his departure from Maldon.

He says he is keeping busy while not being in a management role and is looking to get back into the game when the right opportunity arises.

“I am doing some scouting at the moment which I am enjoying because I am helping a younger manager, I am helping Dagenham & Redbridge,” Taylor said.

“I am definitely interested in doing something like I did Maldon again.

“I am still fit enough, I took a training session at Bromley’s U21’s so hopefully that phone will ring one day!”

Still fit and firing aged 70, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see Taylor taking the reigns of a non-league side in the near future.

Subscribe to our newsletter!
One a month, no spam, honest

Now on air
Coming up
More from Local sport
More from Phoenix FM