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Resurrection and The Golden Years - 24 May 2024
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What To do in The Garden – Second Week of December

In The Flower Garden

 

  • Clear away annual climbers, like sweet peas and morning glory, and cup and saucer plants growing up trellises or obelisks
  • Pick seed heads and evergreen foliage and mix with fruit such as clementines or limes to make a fresh Christmas wreath
  • Move tubs of shrubs or winter bedding to a sheltered spot if conditions turn very cold
  • Take root cuttings of oriental poppies and other perennials
  • Look for early flowering snowdrops to pot up and bring into the house
  • Prepare soil well before planting new roses
  • Cover branches of holly berries with netting to keep birds away
  • Prune overgrown laurel, yew and camellias back hard to rejuvenate them
  • Wrap straw or bracken around the base of tender shrubs and climbers to protect them the from cold
  • Check stakes and ties are secure on trees and climbers

In The Fruit and Vegetable Garden

 

  • Make a composting trench to enrich soil where beans will grow next spring
  • Make compost from spent crops
  • Dig over vacant areas
  • Lift and divide congested clumps of rhubarb
  • Cut down asparagus fronds and the tops of Jerusalem artichokes
  • Buy in rotted farmyard manure or other composted green waste
  • Use cloches to protect winter peas, beans and salads
  • Lift and pot up chicory roots to force chicons
  • Plant new fruit trees, bushes and cane fruits
  • Bring potted bay trees under cover if conditions turn very cold

 

In The Greenhouse

 

  • Keep potted herbs on the staging to crop over winter
  • Move potted bulbs into the greenhouse to develop before bringing into the house
  • Clear out old crops and growing bags
  • Water sparingly and aim to keep the atmosphere as dry as possible over winter to reduce the spread of disease
  • Check dahlia tubers and bulbs in store for signs of rot
  • Pick off fading or diseased leaves from pelargoniums and other plants
  • Continue ventilating the greenhouse on warm days
  • Cut down chrysanthemums after flowering
  • Prune dormant vines

Generally

 

  • Cover soil with polythene sheets to keep it dry so that winter digging can be completed
  • Keep your Christmas tree outside in a bucket of water until you’re ready to bring it indoors to decorate
  • Wash cloches and cold frames
  • Order manure or mushroom compost to dig in over winter, or pile onto the soil for the worms to drag under
  • Cut down marginal plants surrounding ponds
  • Send off for mail-order seed and perennials catalogues
  • Mow your lawn on a dry day with the blades set high
  • Wrap outside taps with insulation material to prevent them freezing and turn off the water supply inside your house
  • Place a floating heater or a ball in ponds to stop ice completely covering the surface
  • Move tender or valuable houseplants away from cold window sills every evening

What To do in The Garden – Second Week of December

In The Flower Garden

 

  • Clear away annual climbers, like sweet peas and morning glory, and cup and saucer plants growing up trellises or obelisks
  • Pick seed heads and evergreen foliage and mix with fruit such as clementines or limes to make a fresh Christmas wreath
  • Move tubs of shrubs or winter bedding to a sheltered spot if conditions turn very cold
  • Take root cuttings of oriental poppies and other perennials
  • Look for early flowering snowdrops to pot up and bring into the house
  • Prepare soil well before planting new roses
  • Cover branches of holly berries with netting to keep birds away
  • Prune overgrown laurel, yew and camellias back hard to rejuvenate them
  • Wrap straw or bracken around the base of tender shrubs and climbers to protect them the from cold
  • Check stakes and ties are secure on trees and climbers

In The Fruit and Vegetable Garden

 

  • Make a composting trench to enrich soil where beans will grow next spring
  • Make compost from spent crops
  • Dig over vacant areas
  • Lift and divide congested clumps of rhubarb
  • Cut down asparagus fronds and the tops of Jerusalem artichokes
  • Buy in rotted farmyard manure or other composted green waste
  • Use cloches to protect winter peas, beans and salads
  • Lift and pot up chicory roots to force chicons
  • Plant new fruit trees, bushes and cane fruits
  • Bring potted bay trees under cover if conditions turn very cold

 

In The Greenhouse

 

  • Keep potted herbs on the staging to crop over winter
  • Move potted bulbs into the greenhouse to develop before bringing into the house
  • Clear out old crops and growing bags
  • Water sparingly and aim to keep the atmosphere as dry as possible over winter to reduce the spread of disease
  • Check dahlia tubers and bulbs in store for signs of rot
  • Pick off fading or diseased leaves from pelargoniums and other plants
  • Continue ventilating the greenhouse on warm days
  • Cut down chrysanthemums after flowering
  • Prune dormant vines

Generally

 

  • Cover soil with polythene sheets to keep it dry so that winter digging can be completed
  • Keep your Christmas tree outside in a bucket of water until you’re ready to bring it indoors to decorate
  • Wash cloches and cold frames
  • Order manure or mushroom compost to dig in over winter, or pile onto the soil for the worms to drag under
  • Cut down marginal plants surrounding ponds
  • Send off for mail-order seed and perennials catalogues
  • Mow your lawn on a dry day with the blades set high
  • Wrap outside taps with insulation material to prevent them freezing and turn off the water supply inside your house
  • Place a floating heater or a ball in ponds to stop ice completely covering the surface
  • Move tender or valuable houseplants away from cold window sills every evening

What To do in The Garden – Second Week of December

In The Flower Garden

 

  • Clear away annual climbers, like sweet peas and morning glory, and cup and saucer plants growing up trellises or obelisks
  • Pick seed heads and evergreen foliage and mix with fruit such as clementines or limes to make a fresh Christmas wreath
  • Move tubs of shrubs or winter bedding to a sheltered spot if conditions turn very cold
  • Take root cuttings of oriental poppies and other perennials
  • Look for early flowering snowdrops to pot up and bring into the house
  • Prepare soil well before planting new roses
  • Cover branches of holly berries with netting to keep birds away
  • Prune overgrown laurel, yew and camellias back hard to rejuvenate them
  • Wrap straw or bracken around the base of tender shrubs and climbers to protect them the from cold
  • Check stakes and ties are secure on trees and climbers

In The Fruit and Vegetable Garden

 

  • Make a composting trench to enrich soil where beans will grow next spring
  • Make compost from spent crops
  • Dig over vacant areas
  • Lift and divide congested clumps of rhubarb
  • Cut down asparagus fronds and the tops of Jerusalem artichokes
  • Buy in rotted farmyard manure or other composted green waste
  • Use cloches to protect winter peas, beans and salads
  • Lift and pot up chicory roots to force chicons
  • Plant new fruit trees, bushes and cane fruits
  • Bring potted bay trees under cover if conditions turn very cold

 

In The Greenhouse

 

  • Keep potted herbs on the staging to crop over winter
  • Move potted bulbs into the greenhouse to develop before bringing into the house
  • Clear out old crops and growing bags
  • Water sparingly and aim to keep the atmosphere as dry as possible over winter to reduce the spread of disease
  • Check dahlia tubers and bulbs in store for signs of rot
  • Pick off fading or diseased leaves from pelargoniums and other plants
  • Continue ventilating the greenhouse on warm days
  • Cut down chrysanthemums after flowering
  • Prune dormant vines

Generally

 

  • Cover soil with polythene sheets to keep it dry so that winter digging can be completed
  • Keep your Christmas tree outside in a bucket of water until you’re ready to bring it indoors to decorate
  • Wash cloches and cold frames
  • Order manure or mushroom compost to dig in over winter, or pile onto the soil for the worms to drag under
  • Cut down marginal plants surrounding ponds
  • Send off for mail-order seed and perennials catalogues
  • Mow your lawn on a dry day with the blades set high
  • Wrap outside taps with insulation material to prevent them freezing and turn off the water supply inside your house
  • Place a floating heater or a ball in ponds to stop ice completely covering the surface
  • Move tender or valuable houseplants away from cold window sills every evening

What To do in The Garden – Second Week of December

In The Flower Garden

 

  • Clear away annual climbers, like sweet peas and morning glory, and cup and saucer plants growing up trellises or obelisks
  • Pick seed heads and evergreen foliage and mix with fruit such as clementines or limes to make a fresh Christmas wreath
  • Move tubs of shrubs or winter bedding to a sheltered spot if conditions turn very cold
  • Take root cuttings of oriental poppies and other perennials
  • Look for early flowering snowdrops to pot up and bring into the house
  • Prepare soil well before planting new roses
  • Cover branches of holly berries with netting to keep birds away
  • Prune overgrown laurel, yew and camellias back hard to rejuvenate them
  • Wrap straw or bracken around the base of tender shrubs and climbers to protect them the from cold
  • Check stakes and ties are secure on trees and climbers

In The Fruit and Vegetable Garden

 

  • Make a composting trench to enrich soil where beans will grow next spring
  • Make compost from spent crops
  • Dig over vacant areas
  • Lift and divide congested clumps of rhubarb
  • Cut down asparagus fronds and the tops of Jerusalem artichokes
  • Buy in rotted farmyard manure or other composted green waste
  • Use cloches to protect winter peas, beans and salads
  • Lift and pot up chicory roots to force chicons
  • Plant new fruit trees, bushes and cane fruits
  • Bring potted bay trees under cover if conditions turn very cold

 

In The Greenhouse

 

  • Keep potted herbs on the staging to crop over winter
  • Move potted bulbs into the greenhouse to develop before bringing into the house
  • Clear out old crops and growing bags
  • Water sparingly and aim to keep the atmosphere as dry as possible over winter to reduce the spread of disease
  • Check dahlia tubers and bulbs in store for signs of rot
  • Pick off fading or diseased leaves from pelargoniums and other plants
  • Continue ventilating the greenhouse on warm days
  • Cut down chrysanthemums after flowering
  • Prune dormant vines

Generally

 

  • Cover soil with polythene sheets to keep it dry so that winter digging can be completed
  • Keep your Christmas tree outside in a bucket of water until you’re ready to bring it indoors to decorate
  • Wash cloches and cold frames
  • Order manure or mushroom compost to dig in over winter, or pile onto the soil for the worms to drag under
  • Cut down marginal plants surrounding ponds
  • Send off for mail-order seed and perennials catalogues
  • Mow your lawn on a dry day with the blades set high
  • Wrap outside taps with insulation material to prevent them freezing and turn off the water supply inside your house
  • Place a floating heater or a ball in ponds to stop ice completely covering the surface
  • Move tender or valuable houseplants away from cold window sills every evening
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